Appliance Amperage Draws

 

Appliances vary greatly as to how much power they draw. Electric motors typically have a surge draw of many more amps than their normal running load. This is particularly typical in high inductive load applications such as air conditioners where the starting surge can be 3 times the normal no-load amps and the current draw when running under a heavy load can be double the no-load amps. Resistant loads, such as lights and heating elements have a steady fixed current draw at all times.

The true measurement of power is in wattage. However, volts time amps = watts so it's a simple mathematical equation to convert from one to the other. For your convenience the following chart shows both. As always, be sure to check the nameplate for the rated current draw to get the exact rating for your particular appliance. The following chart represents a wide cross section of items and is useful as an approximation.

Appliance Load Range (Watts) Average Load (Watts) Amps
Air Conditioner (each) 1400-2000 1700 14.1
Battery Charger Up to 2,000 1000 8.3
DC Convertor 300-1200 750 6.2
Refrigerator 600-1000 800 6.6
Microwave Oven 1000-1500 1250 10.4
Electric Frying Pan/Wok 1000-1500 1250 10.4
Electric Stove Element 530-1500 675 5.6
Electric Water Heater (6 gallon) 1000-1500 1250 10.4
Electric Iron 500-1200 850 7.1
Hair Dryer 500-1500 1000 8.3
Electric Coffee Pot 550-750 650 5.4
Television (CRT) 200-600 400 3.3
Radio 50-200 125 1.0
Electric Drill 250-750 500 4.2
Electric Broom 200-500 350 2.9
Electric Blanket 50-200 125 1.0
Portable Heater (Ceramic) 1500-750 1500 12.5
Toaster 1200 1200 10.0
Food Processor 720 720 6.0
Hand Vacuum 240 240 2.0
Crock Pot 230 230 1.9
Satellite Dish and Receiver 200 200 1.7
Heating Pad 60 60 0.5

 

Submitted by Mike Sundberg - 1/05/06
 

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